Question:

In John 6:44, the Greek word for "draw" is elko which means "to compel by an irresistible force." This sounds, to me, like God's intervention.

Answer:

The Greek word for "draw" in John 6:44 is helkuse the third person, singular, subjunctive, aortist, active form of the word helkuo or helko. It is used to refer to drawing a sword from a scabbard (John 18:10), drawing nets onto the shore (John 21:11), being dragged to the marketplace (Acts 16:19), being pulled out of the temple (Acts 21:30), and being hauled before courts (James 2:6).

"Vines notes that helko usually signifies an act of relative gentleness, as opposed to suro which means "drag." [Expository Dictionary, "Drag"]. This distinction may be important when the word is used to describe the divine drawing of men to Christ (John 6:44; 12:32). Both the Song of Solomon 1:4 and Jeremiah 31:3 use this term to describe the inner compulsion or drawing of love. Thus the crucified Saviour draws the attention of all and the faith of some." [The Complete Biblical Library Greek - English Dictionary].

You can prove that "draw" is not irresistible by "And He said to them, "Cast the net on the right side of the boat, and you will find some." So they cast, and now they were not able to draw it in because of the multitude of fish" (John 21:6). The net here was resisting because of the number of fish.

The very next verse describes the drawing, which you are ignoring. "No one can come to Me unless the Father who sent Me draws him; and I will raise him up at the last day. It is written in the prophets, 'And they shall all be taught by God.' Therefore everyone who has heard and learned from the Father comes to Me" (John 6:44-45). The drawing is done by the teaching of God. That is why "So then faith comes by hearing, and hearing by the word of God" (Romans 10:17). It is God's Word, so it is God's intervention, but this verse does not indicate that God is working on the hearts of men beyond the teachings in His word.